ACM LIMITS 2017

Third Workshop on Computing within Limits
June 22-24, Santa Barbara, CA, USA

About ACM LIMITS 2017

The ACM LIMITS workshop aims to foster discussion on the impact of present and future ecological, material, energetic, and societal limits on computing. These topics are seldom discussed in contemporary computing research. A key aim of the workshop is to promote innovative, concrete research, potentially of an interdisciplinary nature, that focuses on technologies, critiques, techniques, and contexts for computing within fundamental economic and ecological limits. A longer-term goal is to build a community around relevant topics and research. We hope to impact society through the design and development of computing systems in the abundant present for use in a future of limits.

Organizers

Program Committee

Jay Chen, NYU, jay.chen@nyu.edu
Steve Easterbrook, University of Toronto, sme@cs.toronto.edu
Elina Eriksson, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, elina@kth.se
Bonnie Nardi, UC Irvine, nardi@ics.uci.edu (co-chair)
Lisa Nathan, UBC, lisa.nathan@ubc.ca
Teresa Cerratto Pargman, Stockholm University, tessy@dsv.su.se
Daniel Pargman, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, pargman@kth.se
Don Patterson, Westmont College, dpatterson@westmont.edu
Barath Raghavan, ICSI, barath@icsi.berkeley.edu
Debra Richardson, UC Irvine, djr@ics.uci.edu
Douglas Schuler, Evergreen, douglas@publicsphereproject.org
Bill Tomlinson, UC Irvine, wmt@uci.edu (co-chair)
Ellen Zegura, Georgia Tech, ewz@cc.gatech.edu

Steering Committee

Bonnie Nardi, UC Irvine
Barath Raghavan, ICSI
Michael Goldweber (ACM SIGCAS chair), Xavier



Call For Papers

LIMITS aims to foster research on the impact of present or future ecological, material, energetic, and/or societal limits on computing and computing research to respond to such limits. The medium-term aim of the workshop is to foster concrete research, potentially of an interdisciplinary nature, that innovates on technologies, techniques, and contexts for computing within fundamental limits. A longer-term goal is to build a community around relevant topics and research. A goal of this community is to impact society through the design and development of computing systems in the abundant present for use in a future of limits and/or scarcity.

We envision two broad categories of papers: "discussion papers" and "systems papers" (see below). Submissions do not need to strictly fit into either category. All papers should succinctly frame the limits that are of interest to the author(s).

Discussion papers explore the nature of limits and computing. Good discussion contributions will detail the nature of the limits of interest, describe their impact on computing, and present directions for future research. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Sustainability and computing
  • Re-evaluation of conventional computing premises (e.g. Moore's law)
  • Discussion of new limits and their implications for computing
  • Analysis of unnecessary computing
  • Analysis of greenwashing in computing
  • Ecological economics and/or biophysical economics and computing
  • Implications of limits for computing systems for health, education, agriculture, transportation, entertainment, commerce, etc.

Systems papers describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of computing systems that work within or help cope with limits. Also of interest are evaluations of systems that fail due to limits. Good systems contributions will address problems that meet present or future societal needs, describe clear limits and operational boundaries, and provide a detailed evaluation of the system in question. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Material- and manufacturing-constrained computing devices
  • Energy- and material-efficient computing and communication
  • Wide-area communication under constraints
  • Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Interaction Design under constraints
  • Evaluation of limits to modern computing systems
  • Life-cycle analysis of computing systems under limits
  • Computer architecture for constrained computing
  • Systems for health, education, agriculture, transportation, entertainment, commerce, etc. under limits

Important Dates

Abstract registration deadline: March 1, 2017, 11:59pm Pacific Time
Paper submission deadline: March 11, 2017, 11:59pm Pacific Time
Paper reviews available: March 31, 2017
Camera-ready paper deadline: April 10, 2017

Submissions

Submit papers at this site. (If you have any issues with the submission site, please email barath@icsi.berkeley.edu.)

Papers must be registered, with a title and abstract, by March 1, 2017 at 11:59pm Pacific Time. Papers must be submitted in PDF format by March 11, 2017, 11:59pm Pacific Time.

Papers should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Papers should be in ACM double-column format, using the most recent template (updated in 2015)
  • The main body text should use 9pt Times or Times New Roman font.
  • The body of the paper should be a minimum of 5 pages and a maximum of 9 pages, with an unlimited number of pages allowed for references.

Reviewing will be non-blind; authors should include their names and contact information.

Travel and Local Information

The workshop will be held on the campus of Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA, USA. There will be a registration fee of $150 non-students and $50 for students, with a $25 discount for members of ACM SIGCAS. The fee covers workshop registration, food, and lodging for the workshop. It does not cover transportation. We have very limited funds available for travel grants for air travel. If you do not have other sources of funding and plan to submit a paper and attend the workshop, please contact Barath Raghavan.